yoga

Yoga (Sanskrit, Pāli: योग, /ˈjəʊɡə/, yoga) is a commonly known generic term for physical, mental, and spiritual disciplines which originated in ancient India.[1][2] Specifically, yoga is one of the six āstika (“orthodox”) schools of Hindu philosophy. It is based on the Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali. Various traditions of yoga are found in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism.

Now I know myself as the Lion of cosmic power

Prayer from the book “Whispers from Eternity”
By Paramhansa
Yogananda.
I, a lion-cub of the Divine Mother, found
myself thrown into life among the sheep of human frailties: ofe
fear, failure, and disease. Living long among them, I learned to
bleat with weakness, forgetting my lion-nature and its roars, which
could frighten away all petty, pestering sorrows. O Lion of
Realization, Thou didst drag me away from those bleating sheep to
the mirror-smooth waters of meditation. There didst Thou cry,
“Gaze!” But I held my eyes tightly shut, bleating with fear. Thy
roar of wisdom then reverberated through my body. Thou madest me,
by hard shaking and spiritual urging, open my eyes. And there, lo!
in the crystal pool of my inner peace, I saw my features to be even
as Thine own! Now I know mysel as the Lion of cosmic power. I will
bleat no more with fear, weakness, and suffering, for I roar, now,
with vibrant, almighty power! I bound about through the forest of
all experiences, seizing little creatures of veixing worries, timid
fears, and wild hyenas of disbelief, devouring them ruthlessy. O
Lion of Immortality, roar through me Thine all-conquering power of
wisdom!

Awakening the Kundalini Goddess

( Joseph Campbell )

( SOURCE ) – The essential alphabet of all Tantric lore is to be learned from the doctrine of the seven “circles” (chakras) or “lotuses” (padmas) of the kundalini system of yoga. (See fig. 306.) The long terminal ‘i’ added to the Sanskrit adjective kundalin, meaning “circular, spiral, coiling, winding,” makes a feminine noun signifying “snake,” the reference in the present context being to the figure of a coiled female serpent—a serpent goddess not of “gross” but of “subtle” substance—which is to be thought of as residing in a torpid, slumbering state in a subtle center, the first of the seven, near the base of the spine.

The aim of the yoga then being is to rouse this serpent, lift her head, and bring her up a subtle nerve or channel of the spine to the so-called “thousandpetalled lotus” (sahasrara) at the crown of the head. This axial stem or channel, which is named sushumna (“rich in happiness, highly blessed”), is flanked and crossed by two others: a white, known as ida (meaning “refreshment, libation; stream or flow of praise and worship”), winding upward from the left testicle to right nostril and associated with the cool, ambrosial, “lunar” energies of the psyche; and a red, called pingala (“of a sunlike, tawny hue”), extending from the right testicle to left nostril, whose energy is “solar, fiery,” and, like the solar heat of the tropics, desiccating and destructive.

The first task of the yogi is to bring the energies of these contrary powers together at the base of his sushumna and then to carry them up the central stem, along with the uncoiling serpent queen (kundalini goddess). She, rising from the lowest to the highest lotus center, will pass through and wake the five between, and with each waking the psychology and personality of the practitioner will be altogether and fundamentally transformed.

Crowley on Yoga

EIGHT LECTURES ON YOGA
BY ALEISTER CROWLEY

[EXCERPT]
(12) Having now understood that Yoga is the essence of all phenomena whatsoever, we may ask what is the special meaning of the word in respect of our proposed investigation…

(13) All this Yoga that we know and practice, this Yoga that produced these ecstatic results that we call phenomena, includes among its spiritual emanations a good deal of unpleasantness. The more we study this universe produced by our Yoga, the more we collect and synthesize our experience, the nearer we get to a perception of what the Buddha declared to be characteristic of all component things: Sorrow, Change, and Absence of any permanent principle. We constantly approach his enunciation of the first two ‘Noble Truths,’ as he called them. ‘Everything is Sorrow’; and ‘The cause of Sorrow is Desire.’ By the word ‘Desire’ he meant exactly what is meant by ‘Love’ in ‘The Book of the Law’ which I quoted a few moments ago.

‘Desire’ is the need of every unit to extend its experience by combining with its opposite.

(14) It is easy enough to construct the whole series of arguments which lead up to the first ‘Noble Truth.’ Every operation of Love is the satisfaction of a bitter hunger, but the appetite only grows fiercer by satisfaction; so that we can say with the Preacher: ‘He that increaseth knowledge increaseth Sorrow.’ The root of all this sorrow is in the sense of insufficiency; the need to unite, to lose oneself in the beloved object, is the manifest proof of this fact, and it is clear also that the satisfaction produces only a temporary relief, because the process expands indefinitely. The thirst increases with drinking. The only complete satisfaction conceivable would be the Yoga of the atom with the entire universe. This fact is easily perceived, and has been con- stantly expressed in the mystical philosophies of the West; the only goal is ‘Union with God.’ Of course, we only use the word ‘God’ because we have been brought up in superstition, and the higher philosophers both in the East and in the West have preferred to speak of union with the All or with the Absolute. More superstitions!

(15) Very well, then, there is no difficulty at all; since every thought in our being, every cell in our bodies, every electron and proton of our atoms, is nothing but Yoga and the result of Yoga. All we have to do to obtain emancipation, satisfaction, everything we want is to perform this universal and inevitable operation upon the Absolute itself.

(18) I want you therefore to see the nature of the obstacles to union with the Absolute.

5 States of Chitta

chitta (Sanskrit: “memory”;) — derived from the root chit, “to be conscious”. Chitta is the Subconscious mind. It is the mind-stuff. It is the store-house of memory. Samskaras or impressions of actions are imbedded here. It is one of the four parts of antahkarana.

Patañjali defines yoga (in Yoga-Sutra I.2) as chitta-vritti-nirodha (the cessation of mental fluctuations). Vyasa’s commentary on the first sutra in the Samadhi-pada explains that chitta (the thinking substance or principle) has five stages: 1) the restless (ksipta), 2) the torpid (mudha), 3) the distracted (viksipta), 4) the focused (ekagra), and 5) the restricted (niruddha). The first three stages (ksipta, mudha, and viksipta) are not classified as yoga, but the next two stages (ekagra and niruddha) are classified as yoga.