Killing Anger

( Sagāthāvagga / Devaputtasamyutta, Pali Canon )

At Sāvatthi, when the night had advanced, the young Deva Māgha, of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire Jeta’s Grove, approached the Buddha. Having approached, he paid homage to the Buddha, stood to one side, and addressed the Buddha in verse :

Deva Māgha :
Having slain what does one sleep soundly?
Having slain what does one not sorrow?
What is the one thing, O Buddha,
Whose killing you approve?

Buddha :
Having slain anger, one sleeps soundly;
Having slain anger, one does not sorrow;
The killing of anger, O Deva,
With it’s poisoned root and honeyed tip:
This is the killing the noble ones praise,
For having slain that, one does not sorrow.

Ancient City of Buddhas

( The Buddha // Nidānasamyutta )

Suppose, a person wandering through the forest would see an ancient path, an ancient road traveled upon by people in the past. They would follow it and would see an ancient city, an ancient capital that had been inhabited by people in the past, with parks, groves, ponds, and ramparts, a delightful place. Then that person would inform the king or a royal minister : ‘Sire, know that while wandering through the forest I saw an ancient path, an ancient road traveled upon by people in the past. I followed it and saw an ancient city, an ancient capital that had been inhabited by people in the past, a delightful place. Renovate that city, sire!’ Then the king or the royal minister would renovate  the city, and some time later that city would become successful and prosperous, well populated, filled with people, attained to growth and expansion.

So too, I saw an ancient path, the ancient road traveled by the Perfectly Enlightened Ones of the past. And what is that ancient path, that ancient road? It is this Noble Eightfold Path; that is, right view, right intention, right speech, right actions, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. I followed that path and by doing so I have directly known aging-and-death, its origin, it’s cessation and the way leading to it’s cessation. I have directly known birth … existence … clinging … craving … feeling … contact … the six sense bases … name-and-form … consciousness … volitional formations (sankhara), their origin, their cessation and the way leading to their cessation. Having directly known them, I have explained them to all wise people who were prepared to hear it. As a result, this holy life, wise ones, has become successful and prosperous, extended, popular, widespread and well proclaimed amongst devas and humans.

Sand Castles

( The Buddha // Rādasamyutta )
Suppose some little boys or girls are playing with sand castles. So long as they are not devoid of lust, desire, thirst and craving for those sand castles, they cherish them, play with them, treasure them, and treat them possessively. But when those little boys or girls lose their lust, desire, thirst and craving for those sand castles then they scatter them with their hands and feet, demolish them, shatter them, and put them out of play.
So too, wise ones, scatter all illusion, demolish it, shatter it, put it out of play; practice for the destruction of craving. For with the destruction of all craving is Enlightenment.

Measureless liberation of the mind

( The Buddha // 7. Godatta, Cittasamyutta, Salayatanavagga )

A wise one dwells pervading one quarter with a mind imbued with loving kindness, likewise the second quarter, the third quarter, and the fourth quarter. Thus above, and so below, across and everywhere, to all as oneself, one dwells pervading the entire world with a mind imbued with long kindness, vast, exalted, measureless, without hostility, without ill will. One dwells pervading the entire world with a mind imbued with compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity. Thus above, and so below, across and everywhere, to all as oneself, one dwells pervading the entire world with a mind imbued with equanimity, vast, exalted, measureless, without hostility, without ill will. This is called measureless liberation of the mind.

Wealth in the Worldly Life

life-of-buddha-10

( The Buddha // Rāsiya, Salāyatanavagga, Gāmanisamyutta )

One may be praised on four grounds who enjoys the worldly life :
1) One seeks wealth lawfully, without violence, with right livelihood. 2) Having done so, one makes oneself happy and pleased. 3) One shares with others, doing meritous deeds. 4) One uses one’s wealth without being tied to it, un-infatuated with it, not blindly absorbed in it, seeing the danger in it, and understanding the escape.

A great rain cloud of mindfulness

( The Buddha //  9. At Vesālī, Anāpānasamyutta, Mahāvagga, Samyutta Nikāya, Pali Canon )

Just as in the last month of the hot season, when a mass of dust and dirt has swirled up, a great rain cloud out of season disperses it and quells it on the spot, so too concentration by mindfulness of breathing, when developed and cultivated, is peaceful and sublime, an ambrosial pleasant dwelling, and it disperses and quells evil unwholesome states on the spot whenever they arise. And how is this so?

Having gone to the forest, to the foot of a tree, or to an empty room, one sits down. Having folded the legs crosswise, straightened the body, and setup mindfulness in front of one’s self, just mindful one breathes in, mindful one breathes out, training thus : “Contemplating detachment, I breath in. Contemplating detachment, I breath out.”

In such a way this ploughing is done

Buddha

( The Buddha //  12. Kasi Bhāradvāja, Brāhmanasamyutta, Sagāthāvagga, Samyutta Nikāya, Pali Canon )

Faith is the seed, austerity the rain,
Wisdom my yoke and plough;
Virtue is the pole, mind the yoke tie,
Mindfulness is my ploughshare and goad.

Guarded in body, guarded in speech,
Controlled in my appetite for food,
I use truth as my weeding-hook,
And gentleness as my unyoking.

Energy is my beast of burden,
Carrying me to security from bondage.
It goes ahead without stopping
To where, having gone, one does not sorrow.

In such a way this ploughing is done
Which has the eternal life as its fruit.
Having finished this work of ploughing,
One is released from all suffering.

I kindle the inner light alone

(The Buddha //  9. Sundarika, Brāhmanasamyutta, Sagāthāvagga, Samyutta Nikāya, Pali Canon)

When kindling wood, do not imagine
This external deed brings purity;
The masters say no purity is gained
By one who seeks it outwardly.

Having given up the fire made from wood,
I kindle the inner light alone.
Always ablaze, my mind is always concentrated,
Fully liberated in the eternal life.

Four Possessions of a Stream-enterer

(The Buddha // 6, Sotāpattisamyutta, Mahāvagga, Samyutta Nikāya, Pali Canon)

The noble disciple who possesses four things is a stream-enterer. What four? Here, a noble disciple possesses confirmed confidence in 1.) the Buddha, 2.) the Dharma and 3.) the Sangha. 4.) One dwells at home with a mind devoid of the stain of stinginess, freely generous, open handed, delighting in relinquishment, one devoted to charity, delighting in giving and sharing. A noble disciple who possesses these four things is a stream-enterer, no longer bound to the nether world, fixed in destiny, with enlightenment as the destination.

For whom you have compassion…

( The Buddha // Samyutta Nikaya )

Wise ones, those for whom you have compassion and who think you should be heeded — whether friends or colleagues, relatives or kinsfolk — these you should teach, clarify and establish in the development of the dharma.